Saturday, February 14, 2015

Love is Here, Classic Love Quotes


"People disappeared, reappeared, made plans to go somewhere, and then lost each other, searched for each other, found each other a few feet away."
F. Scott Fitzgerald - The Great Gatsby

"If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes have not changed, but one word from you will silence me forever. If, however, your feelings have changed, I will have to tell you: you have bewitched me, body and soul, and I love… I love… I love you. I never wish to be parted from you from this day on."
Jane Austen - Pride & Prejudice

"He stepped down, trying not to look long at her, as if she were the sun, yet he saw her, like the sun, even without looking."
Leo Tolstoy - Anna Karenina 

"It has made me better loving you ... it has made me wiser, and easier, and brighter. I used to want a great many things before, and to be angry that I did not have them. Theoretically, I was satisfied. I flattered myself that I had limited my wants. But I was subject to irritation; I used to have morbid sterile hateful fits of hunger, of desire. Now I really am satisfied, because I can’t think of anything better."
 Henry James - The Portrait Of A Lady

"Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear."
Emily Brontë - Jane Eyre 

"Doubt thou the stars are fire; Doubt that the sun doth move; Doubt truth to be a liar; But never doubt I love." 
William Shakespeare - Hamlet

"You know what I am going to say. I love you. What other men may mean when they use that expression, I cannot tell; what I mean is, that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction which I have resisted in vain, and which overmasters me. You could draw me to fire, you could draw me to water, you could draw me to the gallows, you could draw me to any death, you could draw me to anything I have most avoided, you could draw me to any exposure and disgrace. This and the confusion of my thoughts, so that I am fit for nothing, is what I mean by your being the ruin of me. But if you would return a favourable answer to my offer of myself in marringe, you could draw me to any good - every good - with equal force." 
Charles Dickens - Our Mutual Friend

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